Tuesday, 29 May 2018

Module 5–Chapter 11–Design from Landscape

So, I think I enjoyed this chapter a little too much, which is good, because I’ve always been a little bit bored by mark making. Couldn’t see the point, but now its making much more sense to me. Its fundamental to any work, and when you look at the work of Shelley Rhodes and Amanda Hislop and Gwen Hedley, there is beauty in the way they explore ways of using creative mark making.
The aim was to decorate some papers with both flat textures and raised textures, exploring ways of making marks which related well to the textures in my source images. These will then be cut up to make designs. The colour must be based around one main colour that is suggested from the landscape research images.
I found a lovely app for my phone, Real Colours is a palette generator. It analyses a photograph and generates the 5 most representative colours from the image.

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This was really helpful in assisting me to select a colour range.
The next step was to create papers with flat textures. I experimented with a large range of different papers, newspaper & newsprint, cartridge paper, tissue, lens tissue, abaca tissue, tea bag and deli paper, mulberry paper, khadi paper, hand made paper and Chinese rice paper.

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I painted these with a combination of walnut ink and bleach, acrylic paint and brusho, then overprinted with natural sponge, and various rollers & stencils to create a selection of colourful papers.

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I selected a couple of images to use as pattern inspiration.

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I felt that the strong rigid linear format of the trees gave a pleasing contrast to the irregular, random, scrunched pattern of the leaves.

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Next I worked on raised, relief textured papers.

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firstly I selected one of my painted khadi papers & stitched slightly wavy lines to echo the linear patterns on the paper. I used a wing needle from behind to give a ‘punched out’ slightly raised texture of holey lines. The light shines through these holes which adds another exciting dimension to the paper.

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Selecting another painted paper, I painted the reverse in dark brown. I then used a leather punch in a half moon shape, hammering semi-circles into the paper and folding back to reveal the back of the paper. I placed this over a burnt sienna patterned paper.

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Simple, but effective with its rough, linear texture, I painted some corrugated card!

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On a piece of painted deli paper, I used a soldering iron to burn holes. This gave a lovely light reflection when placed in sunlight on white paper, with the holes edged in the darker brown singed paper giving a slightly raised texture.

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I tore strips of decorated papers and stitched them to another painted background with a twin needle. I then folded some of the papers back to give a raised texture.

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I loved the decorated text used in the last chapter, so was compelled to compose a collection of words about my source images and write it with hot glue gun over another decorated paper before using a gold metallic ‘rub-on’ (I didn’t have copper to hand!)

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Scrunched tissue paper stuck onto a firm sheet of watercolour paper with a thick layer of PVA. Painted when dry with a wash of walnut ink. I love the way the different textures in the paper hold the ink so that it appears darker in some places than in others.

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Lines of texture paste textured with a child’s sponge roller, again painted with a wash of walnut ink when dry. I love walnut ink! The colour changes within the different surface textures are amazing!

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I scraped pollyfiller onto a sheet of watercolour paper with a palette knife, trying to get a combination of rough and smooth random marks which were then enhanced with walnut ink. I think I should have tried to leave patches of paper without the polyfiller, it might have given an even more interesting colour effect.

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I mixed sand with PVA and spread it onto watercolour paper with the back of a spoon, to give a very heavy texture. I’d like to play more with this process, experimenting with different consistencies and thicknesses of ‘paste’ to create different textural patterns. The wash of walnut ink was absorbed into the texture, so perhaps a layer of gesso might have been a good idea before painting. I think there is room for a lot more exploration!

USE OF SHAPE
Referring to my source images, I looked for simple divisions to create shapes. I made line drawings, and then used some of my decorated papers to subdivide in different ways.

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Monday, 16 April 2018

Module 5 – Chapter 10–Stitch to Translate

Rubbings from Chapter 9 have been translated into stitchery. One stitch was used for each sample in different variations or thicknesses of thread in an attempt to achieve the effect of the rubbing.

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I started this sample by creating a rubbing of the texture onto the fabric to form a background. I then used a series of randomly spaced and overlapping fly stitches using different threads – machine thread, fine string and sheer ribbon. I love the resulting ‘graffiti’ effect.

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Again, I created a rubbing of the paper texture onto the fabric with white oil pastel. This time I used detached chain to replicate the original rubbing on tissue paper. I feel the bold long, narrow stitches in heavy cotton form a striking contrast to the more delicate ‘fluttering’ stitches made with thin string.

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I really like this sample. Using simple running stitch, I first re-created the undulating lines transposed from the paper texture onto the original rubbing. I then stitched the circular and semi circular forms with a slightly heavier string thread.

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I loved the organic, broken twisty image of the rubbing on the tissue paper, and felt that buttonhole stitch would reflect the appearance of movement. I worked these stitches in machine thread, and a thicker silk thread.

Saturday, 17 March 2018

Module 5–Chapter 9–Threads and Sitchery


A collection of white and neutral coloured threads. My favourite yarns to collect are natural cottons linens and silks. I find them a joy to touch, feel, smell, and to stitch with. I'm also tempted, by and attracted to fancy, fluffy, bobbly, stingy, hairy and metallic synthetic yarns. I don't find them as rewarding to handle, and stitch with, but they can be tantalizingly beautiful when used with consideration.

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A selection of different stitches.


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I chose lazy daisy stitch (or detatched chain) and chain stitch to further experiment with making marks by varying patterns, size,spacing, tension and thread.

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More informal rhythms of lazy daisy stitch.

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RUBBINGS FROM RELIEF SURFACES


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original

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black ink over oil pastel on white tissue

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multiple rubbings with oil pastel

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white oil pastel on black tissue paper

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white chalk on black tissue paper

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original

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black ink over oil pastel on white tissue

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multiple rubbings with oil pastel

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white oil pastel on black tissue paper

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white chalk on black tissue paper

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original

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black ink over oil pastel on white tissue

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multiple rubbings with oil pastel

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white oil pastel on black tissue paper

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white chalk on black tissue paper

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original

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black ink over oil pastel on white tissue

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multiple rubbings with oil pastel

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white oil pastel on black tissue paper

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white chalk on black tissue paper

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original

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black ink over oil pastel on white tissue

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multiple rubbings with oil pastel

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white oil pastel on black tissue paper

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white chalk on black tissue paper

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original

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black ink over oil pastel on white tissue

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multiple rubbings with oil pastel

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white oil pastel on black tissue paper

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white chalk on black tissue paper